Renaissance Dam: Egyptian warning of possible congestion … and Sudan accuses Ethiopia of “buying time”

Dubai, United Arab Emirates (CNN) – Egypt and Sudan warned, Thursday, of Ethiopia’s rejection of their proposal on the existence of quadripartite mediation to contribute to reaching an agreement on the Grand Renaissance Dam.

The Sudanese Minister of Irrigation, Yasser Abbas, said in his account on Twitter that, “By rejecting the Quartet mediation, Ethiopia is working to buy time and start the second filling without an agreement.”

This comes at a time when the Egyptian Minister of Irrigation, Mohamed Abdel Aty, said that the Ethiopian position will complicate the crisis and increase the tension in the region, according to the government-owned Al-Ahram newspaper.

Abdel Aty’s statements came on the sidelines of his meeting with the Egyptian Prime Minister, Mostafa Madbouly, on Thursday.

During the meeting, Abdel Aty talked about the results of the round of negotiations between the three countries that had been held in the Democratic Republic of the Congo a few days ago, saying that no progress had been made and no agreement had been reached on the resumption of negotiations.

The Egyptian Minister of Irrigation indicated that Ethiopia rejected the proposals and alternatives presented by Cairo and Khartoum, including the presence of quadripartite mediation that includes the African and European Unions, America and the United Nations.

And last Thursday, the Ethiopian Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced, on Thursday, the arrival of the proportion of construction work on the dam.

For nearly a decade, Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia went through inconclusive negotiations. The two countries adhere to Addis Ababa’s signing of a legally binding agreement, which deals with the conditions for filling the dam and the controls for its operation in drought years.

Recently, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi repeated his warnings against infringing Egypt’s rights in the waters of the Nile, saying that it is a “red line”, and that encroachment upon it may enter the region in a state of instability.

Egypt obtains about 90% of its water needs through the Nile River. Its annual share is 55.5 billion cubic meters, while Sudan gets 18.5 billion cubic meters.

Ethiopia had announced that it would go ahead with the second filling of the Renaissance Dam lake, despite the objections of Cairo and Khartoum, and Addis Ababa conducted the first filling process on July 15, 2020.

The second filling process raises great concerns, amid warnings of its impact on water facilities in Egypt and Sudan, and the two countries’ share of water.

The Ethiopian dam, worth more than $ 4 billion, is the largest hydroelectric project in Africa.

Egypt obtains about 90% of its water needs through the Nile River. Its annual share is 55.5 billion cubic meters, while Sudan gets 18.5 billion cubic meters.

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