Young women shocked to discover their personal photos stolen to promote illicit content on OnlyFans

Stolen Instagram images of young Australian women used to create OnlyFans accounts – as scammers try to lure in their friends and FAMILY

  • New catfishing scam targets young women by stealing their personal photos
  • Scammers upload the photos to OnlyFans promising explicit sexual content
  • Three women from Western Australia were shocked to discover the illicit profiles
  • OnlyFans subscribers were promised ‘mind-blowing’ videos for just $15 a month

A new catfishing scam is targeting young Australian women by stealing their personal photos and creating fake accounts that promise illicit content.

Three young women from Western Australia were shocked to discover their name and photos had been stolen for use on a popular subscription service.

The scammers took photos from the women’s Instagram accounts and uploaded them to OnlyFans, a platform in which users pay a subscription to access posts, many of them pornographic.

Perth woman Amy Jackson, 24, was first alerted to the phoney account by her friends, which had already gained a following and received 1200 likes.

Perth woman Amy Jackson, 24, (pictured) was first alerted to the fake OnlyFans accounts by her friends, which promised ‘mind-blowing’ videos for just $15 a month

‘I will make sure my content will surely meet your satisfaction’, the fake OnlyFans profile promised.

‘This will be my first ever explicit content so please be good to me and support me.’

The imposters messaged Ms Jackson’s followers on Instagram with the promise of illicit content, specifically her male friends.

Subscribers could access mind-blowing’ videos for just $15 a month, enticed by the stolen photos of Ms Jackson in a bikini she would occasionally post online.

'I will make sure my content will surely meet your satisfaction', the fake OnlyFans profile promised its subscribers

‘I will make sure my content will surely meet your satisfaction’, the fake OnlyFans profile promised its subscribers

The fake account was removed from Instagram just hours after Ms Jackson reported it, who has since privatised her personal account

The fake account was removed from Instagram just hours after Ms Jackson reported it, who has since privatised her personal account

The marketing officer said she would have been ‘mortified’ if her family and work colleagues thought she was selling sexually explicit material on the platform.

‘It’s unsettling. I had four people message me because, obviously, I’m not the type of person to do that’, she told The West Australian.

The fake account was removed from Instagram just hours after Ms Jackson reported it, and she has since privatised her personal account and axed her following.

It was a similar experience for disability carer Sian McKenzie, who is still haunted by a scammer who stole her photos halfway through 2020.

Perth woman Chesnee Nilsen also had her personal photos stolen and used to promote a fake OnlyFans account, and says she has been reporting the phoney profiles for months

Perth woman Chesnee Nilsen also had her personal photos stolen and used to promote a fake OnlyFans account, and says she has been reporting the phoney profiles for months

Since then, the 25-year-old has been fighting a constant battle to manage the fake accounts who have stolen ten of her personal photos.

‘I can’t tell you how many have been created,’ she said. ‘I felt violated.’

Perth woman Chesnee Nilsen also knows what it feels like to see her personal photos attached to an account selling explicit content.

A ‘limited time offer’ was used to lure subscribers to the fake OnlyFans, a ‘free four-minute video’ for the people who fill the last available slots.

A 'limited time offer' was used to lure subscribers to the fake OnlyFans, a 'free four-minute video' for the people who fill the last available slots

A ‘limited time offer’ was used to lure subscribers to the fake OnlyFans, a ‘free four-minute video’ for the people who fill the last available slots

Acting eSafety Commissioner Rebecca Razavi said prosecuting the scheming scammers is near impossible, as many conduct their business from overseas.

Identity theft scams have proliferated in the age of social media, where many victims unaware their name and images are being exploited.

‘It’s a sad fact of today’s connected world that once you share a message, photo or video online you may not be able to control where it goes or how long it stays online,’ Ms Razavi said.

‘We advise restricting the amount of personal information you share and to only connect with people you know … it really is the best way to ensure your private information and images are not misused.’

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